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Experts predict badger cull results will be 'unimpressive'

By Western Daily Press  |  Posted: October 18, 2012

Professor John McInerney argued that the badger cull would not make economic sense

Professor John McInerney argued that the badger cull would not make economic sense

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Culling badgers will have “unimpressive” results in reducing tuberculosis in cattle and cost taxpayers more than it saves, experts have warned.

Two pilot culls have been given the go-ahead in Gloucestershire and Somerset, which will involve free-running badgers being shot over large areas over the next four years.

Farmers say the cull is necessary to stop badgers spreading TB to cattle, a growing problem which cost farmers and the Government an estimated £150 million last year.

But scientists, including experts who were behind a long-term trial which found that culling 70 per cent of badgers in an area over four years could reduce the incidence of TB in cattle by 16 per cent, raised a number of concerns about the policy.

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Professor Robbie McDonald, of the University of Exeter, said none of the proposed methods for addressing the disease in wildlife – culling, vaccinating badgers or a combination – would have a major impact on reducing the incidence of TB in herds.

“The differences between the approaches are modest and the difference between these approaches and business as usual is not very large,” he said.

“Managing wildlife to control TB in cattle is likely to produce unimpressive results.”

Professor John McInerney, emeritus professor of agricultural policy, University of Exeter, said estimates for the cost of the cull compared to how much it would save in having to deal with fewer TB incidents, showed it did not make economic sense.

Prof McInerney calculated that over 150 square kilometres, the costs of culling were around £1.5 million.

The benefits from reducing the number of herds where TB was found would be £970,000.

“Overall it’s not a good deal,” Prof McInerney said.

Meanwhile, more than 100 protesters joined the Badger Night Walkers at a meeting in Dunster, Somerset, on Tuesday. The meeting was arranged by the Somerset Badger Group and Secret World Wildlife Rescue, organisations that have been leading the call for the vaccination of badgers in the South West.

A walk then took place around the local public footpaths.

On Sunday, Gloucestershire Against Badger Shooting is organising a vigil in the Forest of Dean. The meeting will take place at the clock tower, in the marketplace in Coleford, starting at 7pm.

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  • badgerhugger  |  October 22 2012, 11:11PM

    Nothing new in this report. Only 16% improvement over several years is expected from culling, and this is accepted by both sides of the debate. It has been established that liver fluke interferes with the bTB testing and numerous infected cattle pass the test but remain in the herd in an infectious state. Why is no-one calling for a halt until this is sorted out? In years to come we will be looking back and wondering how we fell for it, like we are now looking back on the police cover-up about the Hillsborough disaster and the Orgreave cover-up

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  • grannyonline1  |  October 18 2012, 10:15PM

    this proposed cull MUST be called off until after the parliamentry debate on the subject, on 25th ocT. No more licenses should be given. If the cull is allowed to go ahead before our MPs have had a chance to view and discuss ALL available information on Tb control in cattle, the goverment, Natural England and Defra should be ashamed of themselves!!!. After all, they have nothing to hide, do they???

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